Mar 272015
 

Stephen Nash speaking to the Sierra Club in Charlottesville.

Climate disruption is often discussed on a global scale, affording many a degree of detachment from what is happening in their own backyards. Environmental journalist Stephen Nash brings home the threat of climate change to the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Mr. Nash spoke to the Sierra Club on March 25, 2015. Sierra Club member John Cruickshank introduced the speaker.

Mar 252015
 

Fourteen Charlottesville High School students presented their versions of TED Talks, called Thought Blocks.

CHS Student Speaking at The Bridge.

The Speakers:
Haley Warren – Writing is a tool
Quincy Pinkston – The Import of Happiness
Cara Warren – In Support of Teenage Exploration
Zaquan Thomas – Music as Message
Joelle Norfleet – What does it mean to be attractive?
Genevieve Riley – Healthy Competition
Nikkia Michie – Our negative experiences can help us grow
Jack Smith – Do something crazy!
John Russel Pinkston – The beautiful lessons of death and dying
Tommy Stadler – The importance of teamwork
Kalif Parker – Why it’s great to be spontaneous
Peter Barcia – The customer is NOT always right
Tess Kendrick – Learning and Curiosity in the 21st Century
Eliya Habimana – What it means to be black in America today

The event was held on March 16, 2015 at The Bridge Progressive Arts Initiative. Jenn Horne, who teaches Public Speaking II at the high school, introduced the speakers.

Mar 122015
 

Tim Hulbert and Tom Olivier present very different views as to the direction our community should take. Listen as they discuss the likely consequences of their positions on the physical environment, taxpayers, local businesses and job seekers.

Grant Tate, Tom Olivier and Tim Hulbert Speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

Tim Hulbert has been president and CEO of the Charlottesville Regional Chamber of Commerce since March 2001. The Charlottesville Regional Chamber has more than 1,100 members and affiliates that together employ more than 45,000 people in the Greater Charlottesville region. Their estimated annual payrolls exceed $1.75 billion. Tim is a native of upstate New York and a graduate of Manhattan College. Prior to coming to the Charlottesville Regional Chamber, he held a similar position with the Rensselaer County, New York Regional Chamber of Commerce. He also held a variety of positions in New York state government, including in the transportation field.

Tom Olivier currently is president of Advocates for a Sustainable Albemarle Population (ASAP). He grew up in New Orleans and moved to Albemarle County in 1981. Tom holds a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from Tulane University and a Ph.D. in biological anthropology from Duke University. Tom has done genetics research on mammalian populations in Africa, Australia and the Caribbean. He is a member of Albemarle County’s Natural Heritage Committee and past chair of the Piedmont Group of the Sierra Club. Tom and his wife, Wren, now raise sheep on their farm in Albemarle County, Virginia.

The debate took place at the Wednesday, March 11, 2015 meeting of the Senior Statesmen of Virginia. The meeting was held at the Senior Center in Charlottesville. Following the presentation, questions were taken from the audience. The program was moderated by CEO and Managing Partner of the bridge ltd, Grant Tate. SSV President Bob McGrath introduced the program.

Mar 012015
 

This week Rick is joined by the Co-Chairs of Charlottesville’s Youth Council, Mo Brown and Ramsey Byrne, along with Areeb Khan, UVA advisor to the Youth Council. The group works with city council and features 17 members aged 13-18. The purpose of Youth Council is to advise the council and inform the community about issues that affect youth, and makes recommendations on how they feel Charlottesville can be a better city.

Feb 282015
 

The City of Charlottesville is considering a 1% increase in the tax restaurants charge their patrons. Listen as WTJU’s Lewis Reining and Charlotte Paxton discuss the issue with Charlottesville Tomorrow journalist Sean Tubbs.

The excerpt you are about to hear was taken from the Monday February 23, 2015 edition of WTJU’s Soundboad.

Feb 152015
 

Rick Moore has assembled a group to discuss how poverty affects the Charlottesville area. Alicia Lenahan, President of Piedmont CASA, the Court Appointed Special Advocates work for children whose parents are unable or unwilling to keep their children safe. Ridge Schuyler, director of Charlottesvile Works Initiative, helping local residents find decent work. Although minimum wage is $14K a year, for a Mother with two children to work and commute in Charlottesville, she would need to make about $34K a year. Along with Susan Goins-Eplee, MSN, RN, Bilingual Community Health Nurse for Jefferson Area CHiP, working with parents to make healthy homes, to help interpret, not only the language barrier, but also to interpret and navigate the healthcare system.

On Saturday, February 21 these groups, headed by Piedmont CASA will put on the Community Action Poverty Simulation (CAPS). The goal for the 80 participants is to keep a roof over their head and get their bills paid with a kit to role-play the life of a low-income family. More details on the CAPS simulation here.

More information about Piedmont CASA at pcasa.org, information about Charlottesville Works Initiative at cacfonline.org, and information about Jefferson area CHiP at jachip.org.

Poverty Simulation with Alicia Lenahan

Feb 112015
 

Billie Campbell speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesvile.

Over ten years have passed since the groundbreaking 2020 Plan: Aging in Community was finalized. Action 2020 is an initiative to create a challenging, but doable, 5-year action plan to achieve the goals of the 2020 Plan.

Billie Campbell is the senior program manager for the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission (TJPDC) and executive director of TJPDC Corporation, TJPDC’s companion nonprofit. She has been with the TJPDC since 1999, when she changed careers from structural engineering. She has a wide-ranging role at the TJPDC, managing a variety of projects, heading TJPDC’s housing program, and carrying out management and administrative functions for the regional agency. She has been actively involved in efforts to make our region age-friendly. She has been a leader in the Livable for a Lifetime (L4L) initiative since its inception in 2006 to promote amenities for ease, comfort and hospitality in homes and communities, and is a member of the Chamber’s Aging in Place Business Round Table. She holds a Master of Public Administration from George Mason University.

Ms. Campbell spoke at the Wednesday, February 11, 2015 meeting of the Senior Statesmen of Virginia. The meeting was held at the Senior Center in Charlottesville. Following the presentation, questions were taken from the audience. The program was moderated by SSV Past President Sue Liberman.

Feb 082015
 

On the February 8th Wake-Up Call, Rick is joined by Upper James Riverkeeper Pat Calvert and Upper James Outreach Coordinator Rob Campbell of the James River Association to discuss the storage and transportation of toxic materials in the area. Throughout the hour, they discuss recent accidents involving toxic materials, if our methods for transportation of toxic materials are out of date, and the most effective solutions to prevent future incidents. To learn more about how you can help protect the James River through the Our River at Risk campaign, visit riveratrisk.org.

Feb 062015
 

100K100K2

The WH House 100 Thousand Poets for  Change Global 2014 Event Reading was one of  650 events that occurred internationally on  September 27th.

At WH, a broad poetic spectrum of poetry,  including slam, hip-hop,experimental, free  verse and rhymed was presented by sixteen  readers: Catherine Twomey, Bill Prindle, Erika  Castillo, Mary Burns, Tom Brown, Fred Maus,  Joanna Lee, William Sypher, Fred Wilbur,  Sigrid Mirabella, Jamie Reaser, Jason Kirkey,  James McDowell, Patsy Ascuncion, Susan Shafarzek, and Polly Lazaron — Writer House 100 Thousand Poets for Change Event Volunteer Coordinator.

Feb 012015
 

This time Rick is joined by Stephen Hitchcock, Director & Chaplain at The Haven, and Jordy Yager, journalist. Jordy wrote a piece called The Median Men for Cville Weekly. He spent 9 months learning about a group of 6 individuals that panhandle in the medians at major intersections around Charlottesville that stick together and made a camp to have roots.

Stephen says The Median Men may be a public face of Homelessness, but not necessarily the truest face. He describes the fastest growing homeless demographic as families and unaccompanied youth from 16-24 years old.

The Haven is a day shelter that offers phone and computer access, a place to store belongings and wash clothes. The mission is to help with housing solutions. Stephen says, “Why are people homeless? Because they don’t have a home.”

Jordy’s experience is that the individuals have their own personal story, but the people he got to know believed that you don’t deny what is given to you and that if a care package was given to them if they couldn’t use the products inside, they would find another person in need to give them to.

If you’d like to learn more about The Haven or give to their cause click here. You can read Jordy Yager’s article here.

Jan 302015
 

Several hundred people attended the meeting held at Sutherland Middle School in Albemarle County Thursday.

Several hundred Charlottesville and Albemarle County residents turned up Thursday evening for a town hall meeting to discuss alternatives to the construction of a grade separated interchange at the intersection of Rio Road and US 29 in Albemarle County. The meeting was sponsored by Albemarle County Supervisor Ken Boyd and Smart29.

The meeting was held at Sutherland Middle School on January 29, 2015 and was hosted by Supervisor Boyd. Following the presentation, questions were taken from the audience.

Jan 252015
 

Rick Moore is joined by Jackie Bright, Executive Director, Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Central Blue Ridge. Rick and Jackie discuss the process of matching a kid and a Big by interviewing the child, their family and also doing background checks and then spending time finding the right pairing.

The purpose of Big Brothers Big Sisters, creating individualized support for children that are likely living in poverty so that they can get experiences outside of their communities.

A new pilot program has begun with the Alliance for Black Male Achievement where black male teens are paired with Bigs for mentoring and for workshops which include Soft Scale development, hygiene, conflict resolution.

Hear the program below and find out more about Big Brothers Big Sisters at www.blueridgebigs.org