Apr 282007
 

Donovan Webster is a journalist who regularly freelances for National Geographic and Smithsonian, and the former editor of Outside Living. He’s also the author of the Burma Road, Aftermath: The Remnants of War, and Babylon by Bus. Webster joins Coy Barefoot on WINA’s Charlottesville–Right Now to discuss his career, his life in Charlottesville, and the legacy of David Halberstam.

  10 Responses to “CRN: Donovan Webster discusses his career as a writer”

  1. […] CRN: Donovan Webster discusses his career as a… Donovan Webster is a journalist who regularly freelances for National Geographic and Smithsonian, and the former editor of Outside Living. He s also the author of the Burma Road, Aftermath: The Remnants of War, and Babylon by Bus. Webster joins Coy Barefoot on WINA s Charlottesville Right Now to discuss his career, his life […]

  2. […] Comment on CRN: Donovan Webster discusses his career as a writer by… CRN: Donovan Webster discusses his career as a travel writer Donovan … He’s also the author of the Burma Road, Aftermath: The Remnants of War […]

  3. […] Comment on CRN: Donovan Webster discusses his career as a writer by… CRN: Donovan Webster discusses his career as a travel writer Donovan … He’s also the author of the Burma Road, Aftermath: The Remnants of War […]

  4. […] Comment on CRN: Donovan Webster discusses his career as a writer by… CRN: Donovan Webster discusses his career as a travel writer Donovan … He’s also the author of the Burma Road, Aftermath: The Remnants of War […]

  5. I’m also trying to get in touch with Mr. Webster. I enjoyed his book on the Burma Road, and I was wanting to interview him for my own podcast about transportation. If you’re in touch with him, please ask him to e-mail me.
    Thanks,
    Larry Krantz, Texas Department of Transportation

  6. Good morning from Jerusalem in Israel
    I simply wanted to thank mr D. Webster for his important and magnificant book The Burma Road. It is a pleasure to read him. (I read the Hebrew translation but certainly will purchase the English original). Hope he reads it somehow I do not know how to reach him.
    Thank you

  7. Just finished the Burma Road, as I am preparing to visit Myanmar myself. I was a child during the events of this book, but I remember living through them. What a wonderful book for amateur historians–as compelling as any novel! Thank you, Mr. Webster!
    Mary Jean Lord, Goldendale, WA

  8. I recently read Donovan Websters book, “Burma Road “. Yesterday, by chance, I met an 86 yr old gentleman who was one of the original Merrill’s Marauders written about in the book. He had flown the ‘Hump’ and as I spoke with this man I realised what a privilege it was to be speaking to him. He mentioned many things I had read about in the book and then told him he was a living legend. He smiled through his tears. I would like to let Mr. Webster know about this man and that he lives in my area. AS we parted the Marauder said to me,”I have diabetes, prostate cancer and a bullet hole in my back.” Our WWII heroes are dying every day. There are only about 1000 left. My own late father fought in the South Pacific in WWII. I have his war diary. My late stepfather was shot down over Holland in WWII but survived. My granddaughter is serving proudly in the Army.
    I am a volunteer and team leader with the Dallas/Ft Worth USO. Now I will read, again,the “Burma Road”.

  9. Just read Donovan Websters book, The Burma Road. Would like to contact Mr. Webster and offer him a DVD of our convoy driving the Ledo, Stilwell, Burma Road. I drove a Mack 6X6 truck loaded with 1000 gallons of high octane fuel from Calcutta to Kunming, China. The trip took 23 days driving from dawn to dusk ( 1739 miles ). Same trip by air = 5 1/2 hours. Served with the 69th Depot Repair Squadron, 301st Air Depot Group. We were attached to the 14th Air Force-Flying Tigers. Our convoy was the first to bring workshop vans over the Road. It took the heavy equipment 45 days to complete the trip.
    Others can purchase the DVD @ http://www.flyingtigers69thdrs.org I will turn 90 in March!

    Jeannie Payne stated there are only about 1000 of WWII left. Actually there are about 1.5 million, but the death rate is about 1800 per day.

    God Bless Our America.

  10. Dear Mr. Webster: I am currently writing a biography of George C. Marshall, and covering his work in World War II as the U.S. Army Chief of Staff is a large part of that effort. In studying the conferences that shaped the Allied strategy of the war, I find I have questions about decisions having to do with China-Burma-India. Is there a possibility that I could speak with you by phone regarding this, since it is clear you are quite an expert on this. I work for the George C. Marshall International Center at Dodona Manor in Leesburg, VA. Thank you.

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