Charlottesville–Right Now: Rick Britton joins Coy Barefoot

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Jan 202011
 

1.20.11 Best-selling author and local historian Rick Britton joins Coy to continue their conversational series on the lifetime contributions of Thomas Jefferson. In today’s installment of “TJ’s Greatest Hits,” Britton recounts our 3rd President’s time spent as a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses. At the time, Jefferson was only 25 years old, and Britton discusses what drove him to get into politics, what other big names served as Burgesses alongside TJ, and what important contributions, including serving on the Virginia Committee of Correspondence, were made during his time as a Burgess. Also included is a quiz on some little known Thomas Jefferson facts and trivia. Be sure to check out Britton’s next speaking engagement on Thursday, January 27th at Michie Tavern about Edgar Allen Poe’s time at UVA, and for more information call [(434)977-1234].

Jan 122011
 

1.12.11 Best-selling author and local historian Rick Britton joins Coy to continue their conversational series on the lifetime contributions of Thomas Jefferson. In today’s installment of “TJ’s Greatest Hits,” the discussion centers on the Rivanna River, and the 22-year old Thomas Jefferson heading up the committee raising money to dredge the River for commercial purposes. Britton then runs off a list of titles TJ held in the local government of Albemarle County, and also included is a brief caller quiz on some Jefferson trivia. Be sure to check out Britton’s January 13th (tomorrow) lecture at Michie Tavern on “Anastasia, Charlottesville’s Own Royal Princess,” and for more information call [(404)977-1234].

Jan 062011
 

1.6.11 Author and Associate Professor from the University of Virginia Ervin Jordan, Jr. joins Coy to discuss the recent PBS documentary seriesThe American Experience studying Robert E. Lee. Professor Jordan was featured prominently in the piece, and today he paints a full picture of General Lee’s life. Still a hero today in the Old Dominion, Lee was viewed in his time as the pinnacle of what a Virginian should be, but Jordan is also able to humanize the historical figure pointing out a few of his flaws. In addition, Professor Jordan places the remembrance of the Civil War in the context of commemoration rather than celebration. For further reading from a local perspective, check out Ervin Jordan’s book Charlottesville and the University of Virginia in the Civil War.

Charlottesville–Right Now: Rick Britton joins Coy Barefoot

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Jan 052011
 

1.5.11 Best-selling author and local historian Rick Britton joins Coy to begin their conversational series of the lifetime contributions of Thomas Jefferson. Today’s discussion offers an overview of the topics to come in the series which Coy has aptly titled “TJ’s Greatest Hits.” Also, be sure to check out Britton’s lecture series at Michie Tavern coming up at the end of the month, and for more details call [(434) 977-1234].

Dec 302010
 

David Hoth

David Hoth speaking at the Charlottesville Senior Center.

Regular listeners of our podcasts might know Rick Britton. He’s a historian and cartographer and a frequent guest on WINA’s Charlottesville Right Now with Coy Barefoot.  Rick also designs and hosts Virginia history programs for the Charlottesville Senior Center.

In the fall of 2010, the Senior Center offered one of Rick’s programs entitled “Virginia History 101.” Running from October 7th through November 18th, this six-session lecture series was designed for those interested in Virginia’s fascinating early history. The series focused on some of the big topics that dominated the Old Dominion’s first two centuries, including, Native Virginians, Tobacco, Slavery, the Revolution, George Washington’s Presidency, and Jeffersonian Architecture. The series was followed with a travel session where participants experienced Virginia history first hand.

The November 4, 2010 talk, “George Washington & His Presidency,” was delivered by David Hoth, Editor of the Papers of George Washington (both the Revolutionary Series and the Presidential Series), and a former Editor of the papers of Presidents James K. Polk and Andrew Jackson. Using his extensive knowledge of both Jackson and Washington, Hoth commences with some interesting “compare and contrast” anecdotes. Both Presidents had gained fame as military commanders—and Jackson saw himself as a “Washington-like” hero—but George Washington exhibited much more control and restraint, and his political abilities have been greatly underestimated. Washington cared a bit about money, but he was not motivated by power. What was the driving engine behind his Presidency?

This is the fifth in a six part series for 2010.

Click here to listen to all six lectures in this series:

• December 2, 2010 – The Monacan Nation – Rick Britton
• December 9, 2010 – Tobacco, The First Cash Crop – Susan Kern
• December 16, 2010 – Foodways of the Enslaved – Leni Sorensen
• December 23, 2010 – The Yorktown Campaign – Ed Lengel
• December 30, 2010 – Washington’s Presidency – David Hoth
• January  6, 2011- Architecture in the Jeffersonian Period – Ed Lay

Dec 232010
 

Ed Lengel

Ed Lengel

Regular listeners of our podcasts might know Rick Britton. He’s a historian and cartographer and a frequent guest on WINA’s Charlottesville Right Now with Coy Barefoot.  Rick also designs and hosts Virginia history programs for the Charlottesville Senior Center.

In the fall of 2010, the Senior Center offered one of Rick’s programs entitled “Virginia History 101.” Running from October 7th through November 18th, this six-session lecture series was designed for those interested in Virginia’s fascinating early history. The series focused on some of the big topics that dominated the Old Dominion’s first two centuries, including, Native Virginians, Tobacco, Slavery, the Revolution, George Washington’s Presidency, and Jeffersonian Architecture. The series was followed with a travel session where participants experienced Virginia history first hand.

The lecture for October 28, 2010, “The Yorktown Campaign,” was presented by Ed Lengel, UVA Professor of History, Editor-in-Chief of the Papers of George Washington, and author of a number of books and articles on Washington’s military expertise. Following a fascinating description of Washington’s obsession with attacking Gen. Sir Henry Clinton’s large British garrison at New York City—based on the premise that one great battle would end the war—Lengel then focuses on how the cooperation of the French army and navy, and the intervention of lady luck, put an end to the English Empire’s hold on the American colonies. At the end, at Yorktown, close to 9,000 British veterans surrendered to a Franco-American force almost twice that size!

This is the forth in a six part series for 2010.

Click here to listen to all six lectures in this series:

• December 2, 2010 – The Monacan Nation – Rick Britton
• December 9, 2010 – Tobacco, The First Cash Crop – Susan Kern
• December 16, 2010 – Foodways of the Enslaved – Leni Sorensen
• December 23, 2010 – The Yorktown Campaign – Ed Lengel
• December 30, 2010 – Washington’s Presidency – David Hoth
• January  6, 2011- Architecture in the Jeffersonian Period – Ed Lay

Charlottesville–Right Now: Jim Cobb

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Dec 212010
 

Jim Cobb, History Professor at The University of Georgia joined Coy to discuss his recent New York Times article The Cultural Roots Of Disunion on the buildup to the American Civil War.

Charlottesville–Right Now: Ed Lengel

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Dec 202010
 

12.20.10 Ed Lengel joined Coy to discuss his book Inventing George Washington: America’s Founder, in Myth and Memory.

Charlottesville–Right Now: Andrew Windham and Brian Balogh

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Dec 202010
 

12.20.10 of Andrew Windham and Brian Balogh of Backstory Radio joined Coy to discuss the history of Christmas.

Dec 162010
 

Leni Sorensen

Leni Sorensen

Regular listeners of our podcasts might know Rick Britton. He’s a historian and cartographer and a frequent guest on WINA’s Charlottesville Right Now with Coy Barefoot.  Rick also designs and hosts Virginia history programs for the Charlottesville Senior Center.

In the fall of 2010, the Senior Center offered one of Rick’s programs entitled “Virginia History 101.” Running from October 7th through November 18th, this six-session lecture series was designed for those interested in Virginia’s fascinating early history. The series focused on some of the big topics that dominated the Old Dominion’s first two centuries, including, Native Virginians, Tobacco, Slavery, the Revolution, George Washington’s Presidency, and Jeffersonian Architecture. The series was followed with a travel session where participants experienced Virginia history first hand.

The lecture for October 21, 2010 was entitled “Foodways of the Enslaved.” It was presented by Leni Sorensen, Monticello’s African-American Research Historian, who besides her duties on Jefferson’s “little mountain,” also teaches rural life skills such as canning, butchering, and cookery. Following an introduction of the enslaved individuals laboring in Mr. Jefferson’s kitchens—at Monticello, in Paris, and at the White House—Sorensen delivered a fascinating talk on the surprisingly complicated, and fashionable, meals they prepared. Previously forgotten by history, these cooks and chefs were talented, amazingly literate, and oftentimes multi-lingual.

This is the third in a six part series for 2010.

Click here to listen to all six lectures in this series:

• December 2, 2010 – The Monacan Nation – Rick Britton
• December 9, 2010 – Tobacco, The First Cash Crop – Susan Kern
• December 16, 2010 – Foodways of the Enslaved – Leni Sorensen
• December 23, 2010 – The Yorktown Campaign – Ed Lengel
• December 30, 2010 – Washington’s Presidency – David Hoth
• January  6, 2011- Architecture in the Jeffersonian Period – Ed Lay

Charlottesville–Right Now: Professor J.E. Lendon joins Coy Barefoot

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Dec 152010
 

12.15.10 Professor of History at the University of Virginia J.E. Lendon joins Coy to discuss his new book Song of Wrath: The Peloponnesian War Begins. The new release details the decade of clashes between Athens and Sparta known as the Peloponnesian Wars.  Lendon explains the title of the book, then touches on the process of studying the battle tales of Thucydides before plunging into recreating the bloodshed that was Ancient Greece in the 5th century B.C.

Dec 092010
 

Susan Kern

Susan Kern

Regular listeners of our podcasts might know Rick Britton. He’s a historian and cartographer and a frequent guest on WINA’s Charlottesville Right Now with Coy Barefoot.  Rick also designs and hosts Virginia history programs for the Charlottesville Senior Center.

In the fall of 2010, the Senior Center offered one of Rick’s programs entitled “Virginia History 101.” Running from October 7th through November 18th, this six-session lecture series was designed for those interested in Virginia’s fascinating early history. The series focused on some of the big topics that dominated the Old Dominion’s first two centuries, including, Native Virginians, Tobacco, Slavery, the Revolution, George Washington’s Presidency, and Jeffersonian Architecture. The series was followed with a travel session where participants experienced Virginia history first hand.

On October 12, 2010, Susan Kern presented “Tobacco, The First Cash Crop.” Ms. Kern is a visiting assistant professor in William & Mary’s Lyon G. Tyler Department of History. Throughout Virginia’s early history, the powers that be attempted to diversify the state’s economy, but tobacco, the evil weed, reigned supreme. Tobacco profits insured that Virginia would flourish. Tobacco profits bought trade goods from England, paid local tithes and taxes, and purchased more land and more slaves for its further cultivation.

This is the second in a six part series for 2010.

Click here to listen to all six lectures in this series:

• December 2, 2010 – The Monacan Nation – Rick Britton
• December 9, 2010 – Tobacco, The First Cash Crop – Susan Kern
• December 16, 2010 – Foodways of the Enslaved – Leni Sorensen
• December 23, 2010 – The Yorktown Campaign – Ed Lengel
• December 30, 2010 – Washington’s Presidency – David Hoth
• January  6, 2011- Architecture in the Jeffersonian Period – Ed Lay