Nov 052016
 

Jeff Consiglio at the Virginia Film Festival on November 5th, 2016

Sean McCord talks with producer/editor Jeff Consiglio about his film Best and Most Beautiful Things.

From the Virginia Film Festival: “Michelle Smith, a precocious twenty-year-old woman, lives with her mother Julie in rural Maine. Michelle is quirky and charming, with big dreams and varied passions. She is also legally blind and diagnosed on the autism spectrum. Searching for connection, Michelle explores love and empowerment outside the limits of “normal” through a provocative sex-positive community. The documentary tells her story of self-discovery as she navigates new relationships and attempts to go out into the world on her own”

Best and Most Beautiful Things will be shown at 5:00 PM, Sunday November 6, 2016 at the Downtown Mall: Violet Crown A.

Nov 052016
 

Sean McCord talks with Brian Golden Davis, Rob McBroom about their film The Million Dollar Duck.

From the Virginia Film Festival: “Winner of Best Documentary Feature at the Slamdance Film Festival, this film from director Brian Golden Davis dives into the eccentric world of the Federal Duck Stamp Contest—the only juried art competition run by the U.S. government. The contest is among the most successful conservation tools ever instituted, filled with ego, art, big money, and migratory waterfowl. Following six wildlife artists turned competitors who strive to win “the Olympics of wildlife art,” The Million Dollar Duck brings to life this highly competitive contest as the artists are eliminated one by one, leaving a winner whose work will be seen by millions.”

The Million Dollar Duck airs at 4:15 PM, Sunday, Nov 6, 2016 at the PVCC Dickinson Center.

Nov 052016
 

Pennebaker (left) and Hegedus at the Toronto Film Festival earlier this year.

Sean McCord talks with legendary filmmakers D.A. Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus about their film Unlocking The Cage.

From the Virginia Film Festival: “After 30 years of struggling with ineffective animal welfare laws, animal rights lawyer Steven Wise is making history by filing the first lawsuits that seek to transform an animal with no rights to a “person” with legal protections. Using two years of behind the scenes footage, the documentary team of Chris Hegedus and D.A. Pennebaker exposes Wise’s unprecedented struggle to break down the legal wall dividing animals and humans. Arguing to secure the rights of four chimpanzees in New York State, Wise maintains that cognitively complex animals have the capacity for limited personhood rights that would protect them from physical abuse. Signifying a groundbreaking shift towards the acknowledgement of animal rights, Hegedus and Pennebaker provide an intimate look at a lawsuit that could forever alter our legal system.”

Unlocking the Cage screens Sunday at 1:00 PM; The War Room screens tonight at 6:00 PM.

Nov 042016
 

The Love Witch

Sean McCord talks with Laura Waddell about her role in the film The Love Witch.

From the Virginia Film Festival: “This highly stylized and impeccably crafted drama-thriller follows Elaine, a beautiful and seductive witch, as she concocts spells and potions to manipulate men to fall in love with her. When she finally meets the man of her dreams, her desperation for love drives her to the brink of insanity and murder. Using gothic Victorian décor, a vibrant color palette, and elaborate costume designs, filmmaker Anna Biller pays tribute to 1960s Technicolor thrillers while exploring female fantasy and the repercussions of pathological narcissism.”

Nov 042016
 

Barry Sisson

Barry Sisson

Barry Sisson of the syndicated radio program Indie Film Minute joins Sean McCord to talk about the history of show and how he began it to increase the audience for independent films.

Sisson and the rest of the Indie Film Minute are also screening independent films in collaboration with Light House Studio.

Nov 042016
 

Aaron Wolf at the Virginia Film Festival, November 4, 2016.

Aaron Wolf at the Virginia Film Festival, November 4, 2016.

Aaron Wolf of Howling Wolf Productions talks about his documentary Restoring Tomorrow. The film tells the story of his personal journey of rediscovery by telling the story of a Los Angeles treasure, Wilshire Boulevard Temple. Built by the original Hollywood moguls, the temple came near demise, but became determined to achieve the impossible—raise $150 million to restore its majesty and vibrancy, rebuilding the Jewish community, the greater Los Angeles community—and on a personal level, Wolf himself.

Nov 042016
 

Andy Edmunds of the Virginia Film Office

Andy Edmunds of the Virginia Film Office

Andy Edmunds is the director of the Virginia Film Office. He joins Sean McCord at the Virginia Film Festival to talk about how the film office’s mission is to help increase economic development through attracting more filmmakers to the Old Dominion. The idea dates back to the administration of Governor Gerald Baliles. Edmunds gives examples of the kind of troubleshooting his office does for those who choose to film in Virginia.

Nov 042016
 

Sean McCord and Andrea Shreeman on November 4, 2016 at the Virginia Film Festival.

Sean McCord and Andrea Shreeman on November 4, 2016 at the Virginia Film Festival.

Director Andrea Shreeman speaks with Sean McCord about the world premiere of her short film Sienna Burning which was shot in her home town of Roanoke, Virginia. She describes how the project came together and how it involved help from the Roanoke Rescue Mission and how she’s currently preparing to shoot a feature in Charlottesville.

Sienna Burning will screen at Newcomb Hall Theater before The Sweet Life

Nov 042016
 

Susie Crate

Sean McCord talks with Susie Crate about her role in the film The Anthropologist.

From the Virginia Film Festival: “Katie, a thirteen-year-old girl from Fairfax, Virginia, is carted around the globe by her mother, noted environmental anthropologist Susie Crate, as she studies the effects of climate change on centuries-old indigenous communities. Filmed over the course of five years, The Anthropologist tells the parallel stories of Susie and famed anthropologist Margaret Mead. Mead’s daughter, now an anthropologist in her own right, provides insight into Susie and Katie’s travels, tying Mead’s influential work to present-day struggles to confront change within communities.”

Nov 042016
 

Dorie Barton

Director Doyie Barton talks with Sean McCord about her film Girl Flu.

From the Virginia Film Festival: “Bird, a thoughtful twelve-year-old, must accept that she is developing into a woman whether she wants to or not. In front of her entire sixth-grade class, she gets her first period. Then, ditched by her impulsive, free-spirited mom, Bird is forced to move to Echo Park from Reseda. Mourning her childhood, Bird is surrounded by some helpful and not-so-helpful friends and family. Offering a sweet perspective on a universal, yet underrepresented experience, first-time director Dorie Barton depicts how Bird comes to terms with her new reality. ”

Nov 032016
 

Lydia Moyer, Associate Professor in the McIntire Department of Art at the University of Virginia.

Lydia Moyer, Associate Professor in the McIntire Department of Art at the University of Virginia.

Lydia Moyer, an associate professor in the University of Virginia McIntire Department of Art, speaks with Sean McCord about her experimental films that are appearing at the 2016 Virginia Festival of Film. They will be screened Saturday at 11:00 am at the Vinegar Hill Theater.

From the Virginia Film Festival: “Drawing equally on the natural and socially constructed worlds, these experimental videos play with form and format while focusing on the U.S. as a contemporary and historical site. They cover ground from recent uprisings in response to police violence to climate change to historical relationships between natives and settlers on U.S. ground.”

Nov 032016
 

Filmmakers Lance Warren and Hannah Ayers at the Virginia Film Festival, November 3, 2016

Filmmakers Lance Warren and Hannah Ayers at the Virginia Film Festival, November 3, 2016

Richmond-based filmmakers Hannah Ayers and Lance Warren join Sean McCord to talk about their short film Adrian’s Story.  

The film tells the story of a barber-in-training who is slowly moving forward after years of incarceration. The piece is part of the Richmond Justice project.

Adrian’s Story has previously appeared at the Skyline Indie Film Fest, the Film Festival at Little Washington and Washington West.

Ayers and Warren run Field Studio and previously directed a film about Vinegar Hill called That World is Gone.