Nov 022018
 

At seventy-six years old, Ingrid Gipson compares her former endeavors as a successful Dallas fashion designer in the 1980s to her current, reclusive lifestyle. After retiring from her creative career, Ingrid moved to the woods. She spends her time creating sculptural ceramic art and creating structures out of nearby rocks. Driven by feelings of uncertainty over whether she had succumbed to the roles that society had chosen for her, Ingrid discusses her newfound sense of fulfillment after dropping everything to become a self-sufficient woman in the wilderness.

The 2018 Virginia Film Festival runs November 1-4, 2018.

Nov 022018
 

Before 1967, the American Southeastern Conference boasted a roster composed entirely of white athletes. In the fall of 1967, however, Nate Northington walked on to the University of Kentucky football field and broke the color line. Just a day before, Northington’s roommate and fellow civil rights pioneer Greg Page had died as the result of a tragic accident. In the wake of his death, Northington fulfilled one of Page’s ambitions: to play football alongside white athletes for his university. Documenting this groundbreaking event in sports, Black in Blue gives voice to the role of sports in integration.

The 2018 Virginia Film Festival runs November 1-4, 2018.

Nov 112017
 

Jackson Landers

Journalist Jackson Landers, the writing half of the team behind Charlottesville: Our Streets, talked about the events of August 12, 2017 as captured in their new documentary.

The 2017 Virginia Film Festival runs from November 9th through November 12th.

Nov 112017
 

Colette Burson

UVA graduate and esteemed filmmaker Colette Burson returns to Charlottesville with Permanent, her new film as writer and director. Permanent centers around a 13 year old and her family, a hairstyle gone incredibly wrong, and a young girl’s plight to fit in small town Virginia in 1983. Burson, also the creator of Hung and The Riches, talks of her transition from the UVA drama department to writing and directing for stage, film, and TV.

The 2017 Virginia Film Festival runs from November 9th through November 12th.

Nov 112017
 

Andrew Hamer

Virginia native Andrew Hamer, now a Los Angeles filmmaker, brings his new work as part of the Short Films: Block C. Three Skeleton Key is based on a story by the French author George G. Toudouze and was previously and famously adapted for radio, starring Vincent Price. Hamer’s new short film is a standalone proof-of-concept, and in this interview he talks of his hope of leveraging this into a full feature-length film.

The 2017 Virginia Film Festival runs from November 9th through November 12th.

Nov 102017
 

Brian Wimer

Charlottesville filmmaker Brian Wimer teamed with journalist Jackson Landers for Charlottesville: Our Streets, their documentary look at the events of August 12. Filled with original footage of the attack on Charlottesville, Wimer also talks with counterprotestors, clergy, antics, alt-righters, and the militia who converged on our town.

The 2017 Virginia Film Festival runs from November 9th through November 12th.

Nov 102017
 

Student filmmakers from George Mason University stopped to to talk about the collection of their short films, The Best of Film at Mason, Sunday at 11:15 AM at the Violet Crown C. These young filmmakers are all students working on a variety of genres, from documentary to fiction to music videos.

Nov 102017
 

Filmmaker Doug Bari joins Sean McCord to talk about his film Scenes With Ivan. In this highly personal film, Doug and his wife Judy document the life of their son Ivan from before he was born to a 32 year old adult with children of his own. More information about this and Doug and Judy’s many other films can be found on Doug’s website. The documentary will be shown at the Dickinson Theater at Piedmont Virginia Community on Friday, November 10 at 5:30 p.m.

Nov 092017
 

In addition to helping out the Virginia Film Festival with public relations, John Kelly also serves as a publicist for shows such as The Long Road Home, which will screen an episode at 5:30 pm on Friday at the Culbreth Theatre at the University of Virginia. The eight episode mini-series is being produced by the National Geographic Channel. Kelly talks about the making of the show.

The series, based on The New York Times best-selling book by Martha Raddatz, relives a heroic fight for survival during the Iraq War when the 1st Cavalry Division from Fort Hood was ferociously ambushed on April 4, 2004, in Sadr City, Baghdad — a day that came to be known as “Black Sunday.”

Nov 092017
 

Filmmaker Jason Robinson

Jason Robinson is in the Virginia Film Festival for the fourth time, this time to support his short film Walkalong which will be shown before the film Shadowman on Thursday, November 9 at the Violet Crown. Robinson, a former project manager at Light House Studio, talks with Sean McCord about how the short piece came to be made.

Nov 092017
 

Rebecca Louise Miller

Rebecca Louise Miller is a playwright and now screenwriter whose film One Day Home screens as part of the Short Films: Block A at 3:00 PM Thursday at Vinegar Hill. In the film, Rebecca portrays Frida, and like her protagonist, she just got out of a marriage and goes shopping for a mattress when she meets an inconveniently cute guy and is reminded that a bed is more than just a place to sleep.

The 2017 Virginia Film Festival runs from November 9th through November 12th.

Nov 092017
 

Kevin Everson

Kevin Everson has made eight feature length films and over one-hundred and twenty short films. His newest film screens Friday at 1:00 PM at the Violet Crown A. He is Professor of Art at the University of Virginia. In Tonsler Park Everson uses 16mm black-and-white film to observe the democratic process as it unfolded across Charlottesville voting precincts on November 8th, 2016.