Aug 122015
 

Candidates for the Albemarle County Board of Supervisors and Charlottesville City Council gave their views on many of the issues and priorities for the County and City.

City of Charlottesville candidates speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville. The event was moderated by WINA’s Chris Callahan.


Albemarle County candidates speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

The candidates spoke at the Wednesday, August 12, 2015 meeting of the Senior Statesmen of Virginia. The meeting was held at the Senior Center in Charlottesville. Following the presentation, questions were taken from the audience. The program was moderated by senior reporter for 1070 WINA News Radio Chris Callahan. Chris has been with the station for 41 years and was honored in 2014 by the Associated Press Broadcasters for the Best News Operation of the Year.

Jun 122015
 

The officers of the Charlottesville Area League of Women Voters: Kerin Yates, Gerry Yemen and Patricia Hurst, discuss the mission of the League of Women Voters, its history and the positions adopted by the organization.

From left to right: Gerry Yemen, Kerin Yates and Pat Hurst speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

Kerin Yates has served as president of the LWV of the Charlottesville Area since July 2012. She is a 1958 graduate of Juniata College, Huntingdon, PA., and was a research chemist at NIH for 17 years and was business manager for a medical company in Pittsburgh for 15 years. Kerin is the treasurer of OneVirginia2021 Foundation and volunteers as a substitute driver for Meals on Wheels. Kerin serves as an election official for the County of Albemarle and has been a resident of Albemarle County for eight years. She is married to Professor John T. Yates, Jr. They have two sons and six grandchildren.

Gerry Yemen is the secretary of the LWV of the Charlottesville Area and is a senior researcher with the Darden Graduate School of Business. With any number of organizations, associations, and volunteer opportunities available, why would anyone choose to join the LWV? Gerry Yemen, who became a member shortly following graduate school, discussed what attracted her, why she stays with the organization, and offered her thoughts on how the league’s future relevance.

Patricia Hurst is the treasurer of the LWV and has been a member of the Charlottesville Area Chapter for six years. During this time she has served as president, treasurer, and secretary for the local league. She retired from a 40-year career in computer software engineering which began at NASA Langley in Virginia and ended with the SBA in Washington D.C. In between she worked for various companies in California, Georgia, New York, and London. As an instructor in software engineering, she traveled extensively in the US and other countries. For the past fourteen years, she has owned and actively managed multifamily properties. Pat has two daughters who live in upstate New York and five grandchildren.

The officers spoke at the Wednesday, June 10, 2015 meeting of the Senior Statesmen of Virginia. The meeting was held at the Senior Center in Charlottesville. Following the presentation, questions were taken from the audience. The program was moderated by SSV Board Member Jeff Gould.

Jun 112015
 

Leni Sorensen speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

On April 30, 2015, Leni Sorensen presented the sixth and final part of our CPN Thursday series entitled The Civil War Through Different Lenses (2015).

“In 1820 only 12% of the enslaved had been born in Africa. By the decade leading to the Civil War, American Slaves were Christian, with English their first and only language,” says Sorensen in this interesting talk about the role slaves played in the development of the plantation system.

Leni Sorensen majored in history at Mary Baldwin, and earned her MA and PhD in American Studies at the College of William and Mary. For over thirty years she worked as a university lecturer, museum consultant, hands on presenter and researcher with a focus on African American slavery, American agriculture and Woman’s work in colonial and post-colonial America. Formerly Monticello’s African-American Research Historian, Ms. Sorensen teaches rural life skills such as canning, butchering, and cookery from her home in Western Albemarle County.

The lecture series was organized by award-winning historian and Charlottesville-based author, lecturer, and cartographer Rick Britton in conjunction with the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

Click here to listen to all six parts of this series.

Jun 042015
 

Beth Parnicza speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

On April 23, 2015, Beth Parnicza presented the fifth of our six part CPN Thursday series entitled The Civil War Through Different Lenses (2015).

In this podcast, Ms. Parnicza shares her personal memories of four years of the American Civil War sesquicentennial visiting and tour leading, a review of the Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park’s four commemorations as well as a look at the broader picture of trying to understand what the sesquicentennial was about and what it means to us now and in the future.

Beth Parnicza is an historian with the National Parks Service at the Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park where she supervises the Chancellorsville Battlefield Center and manages volunteers and social media. A 2011 graduate of West Virginia University, her research interests focuses largely on the human element of the Civil War, particularly in understanding the steps taken by individuals toward a harder kind of war and their motivations to do so.

The lecture series was organized by award-winning historian and Charlottesville-based author, lecturer, and cartographer Rick Britton in conjunction with the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

Click here to listen to all six parts of this series.

May 282015
 

Ron Wilson speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

On April 16, 2015, Ron Wilson presented the fourth lecture in our six part CPN Thursday series entitled The Civil War Through Different Lenses (2015).

Listen as Wilson describes with exquisite detail the final 90 minutes of the American Civil War as it happened on April 9, 1865, and the two great men that ended it.

A native of Ohio, Wilson retired from the National Parks Service in 2000 after 34 years of service. He served as Supervisory Park Ranger at Appomattox Court House for 25 years. Previous park service assignments include Gettysburg, Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site, Johnstown Flood National Memorial and the Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial. Mr. Wilson co-authored the Appomattox Paroles April 9-15, 1865 and is a former president of the Lynchburg Virginia Civil War Round Table. He also worked with Civil War battlefield historian Chris Calkins to establish the Lee’s Retreat Driving Tour.

Mr. Wilson graduated from Miami University. During the Vietnam War he commanded a rifle platoon and served as headquarters commandant for the 1st Marine Regiment.

The lecture series was organized by award-winning historian and Charlottesville-based author, lecturer, and cartographer Rick Britton in conjunction with the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

Click here to listen to all six parts of this series.

May 212015
 

Rick Britton speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

On April 9, 2015, Rick Britton presented the third lecture in our six part CPN Thursday series entitled The Civil War Through Different Lenses (2015).

In this podcast you will learn about the role that Monticello played in the American Civil War. At the commencement of the war, Monticello was the property of Uriah Phillips Levy, who had purchased it in 1834. Listen as Rick tells the story of how Monticello’s ownership changed hands several times as the war progressed.

Rick Britton is a historian of the Old Dominion who specializes in 18th- and 19th-century Virginia history. Two of his main areas of expertise are the American Civil War and the life and times of our third president, Thomas Jefferson. Along with his writing, Rick conducts tours of Civil War battlefields, teaches classes on the history of central Virginia, organizes history programming for the Senior Center in Charlottesville, illustrates maps for history books, and lectures all across Virginia on a wide range of topics. With over 200 published articles and essays under his belt, he’s the author of Albemarle & Charlottesville: An Illustrated History and Jefferson: A Monticello Sampler for which he was awarded a medal for non-fiction at New York City’s Book Expo, the nation’s largest book convention. His newest book, Virginia Vignettes (Vol. 1) – Famous Characters & Events in Central Virginia History, is the first of a new series featuring some of the men and women who figure large in 18th- and 19th-century American history.

The lecture was presented by Rick Britton as a part of this series and was held in conjunction with the Senior Center in Charlottesville. Click here to listen to all six parts of this series.

May 142015
 

Christian Cotz speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

Christian Cotz is the director of education and visitor engagement at James Madison’s Montpelier, and has been with the Foundation for fifteen years. He is responsible for the creation, implementation, and oversight of all Montpelier guided tours, hands-on experiences, student programs, interpretive signage and many exhibits. Listen as Mr. Cotz tells the story of Montpelier and it’s most famous resident, President James Madison.

Mr. Cotz spoke at the Wednesday, May 13, 2015 meeting of the Senior Statesmen of Virginia. The meeting was held at the Senior Center in Charlottesville. Following the presentation, questions were taken from the audience. The program was moderated by SSV Vice President John McCauley.

May 142015
 

Ron Coddington speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

On April 2, 2015, Ron Coddington presented the second lecture in our six part CPN Thursday series entitled The Civil War Through Different Lenses (2015).

Listen as Mr. Coddington tells the story of how both the North and South developed their navy during the American Civil War.

While other kids in his neighborhood were collecting baseball cards,  14-year-old Ron Coddington was browsing flee markets looking for old photographs. Little did he realize that after purchasing his first photograph in 1977 that collecting photographic images would become a life long pursuit.

Mr. Coddington is the assistant manager at Chronicle of Higher Education whose work has appeared in USA Today, the Atlanta Journal Constitution and the San Hose Mercury News. Mr. Coddington is a contributing writer to the New York Times disunion series, and writes a monthly column for The Civil War News.

In addition to African American Faces of the Civil War: An Album, Mr. Coddington has written two other books, Faces of the Confederacy: An Album of Southern Soldiers and Their Stories, and Faces of the Civil War: An Album of Union Soldiers and Their Stories.

The lecture series was organized by award-winning historian and Charlottesville-based author, lecturer, and cartographer Rick Britton in conjunction with the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

Click here to listen to all five parts of this series.

May 072015
 

Dale Floyd speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

On March 19, 2015, Dale Floyd presented the first lecture in a new six part CPN Thursday series entitled The Civil War Through Different Lenses (2015).

“The army regulations stipulated that the topographical engineers were to make such surveys and exhibit such delineations as the commanding general shall direct, to make plans of all military positions which the army may occupy and of their respective vicinities indicating the various roads, rivers, creeks, ravines, hills, woods and villages to be found therein,” says Floyd in this interesting podcast.

Born in Dayton Ohio, Mr. Floyd received his BS in education from Ohio University and an MA in history from the University at Dayton. He also completed additional history post graduate work at American University and at the University of Virginia. He has written nine books on military history. Mr. Floyd has been an archivist at the National Archives, and an historian with the US Army Core of Engineers and the National Park Service. As a military historian Mr. Floyd specializes in military architecture, military education and 19th century military history.

The lecture series was organized by award-winning historian and Charlottesville-based author, lecturer, and cartographer Rick Britton in conjunction with the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

Click here to listen to all six parts of this series.

Apr 102015
 

Delegates Rob Bell, and David Toscano provided their perspectives on the issues that came before the 2015 legislature. The delegates spoke at the Wednesday, April 8, 2015 meeting of the Senior Statesmen of Virginia. The meeting was held at the Senior Center in Charlottesville. Following the presentation, questions were taken from the audience. The program was moderated by SSV member Terry Cooper.

Rob Bell (left) and David Toscano speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville.
Robert Bell

Robert Bell (R) – 58th District: An honors graduate of the University of Virginia and the University of Virginia Law School, Rob served as a state prosecutor for five years. He prosecuted over 2,400 cases, working with the police and crime victims to bring criminals to justice.

In the Virginia General Assembly, Rob has written laws that crack down on drunk driving. As a result, MADD (Virginia) named him the 2005 Outstanding Legislator. He is also interested in school safety. In recent years, he has written laws to ban criminal sex offenders from school property during school hours and to require additional background checks on school personnel. In 2008, Rob helped overhaul Virginia’s mental health commitment laws in light of the tragedy at Virginia Tech. And, in 2009, Rob received the Act, Honor, Hope award from the Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance to recognize his work in the Virginia General Assembly.

An Eagle Scout, Rob was an active volunteer with the Boy Scouts and with the public schools prior to his election in 2001. Rob’s wife, Jessica, is a schoolteacher. She is currently staying home to raise their children, Robbie and Evie. The Bells live in Albemarle County and are members of Aldersgate United Methodist Church.

Rob understands that in tough economic times everyone – business, communities, government – needs to pitch in to create and protect Virginia jobs. That’s why Rob has fought to preserve and promote Virginia’s #1 business-friendly ranking. This helps Virginia’s small businesses to expand and encourages new companies to move here.

In response to the 2007 Virginia Tech shootings, Rob was chosen to lead a special Virginia House of Delegates subcommittee charged with reforming Virginia’s mental health commitment laws. The subcommittee’s goals were to ensure that a similar tragedy would not happen again and to protect the ability of Virginians to voluntarily seek care for themselves. In 2008, as a result of the subcommittee’s work, Virginia saw the most sweeping reforms of mental health commitment laws in 30 years.

Rob and Jessica’s son Robbie attends public school. Jessica is a high school English teacher who is currently taking time off to raise Robbie and Evie. As delegate, Rob regularly visits our schools to talk with students. He has taught more than 1,000 students about civics and how laws are made. Rob has also sponsored local students as pages in the Virginia General Assembly and others have served as interns in his legislative office.

Rob is a champion for our communities against crime. He has led an all-out assault against drunk driving and has fought to protect our families from sex offenders. Rob has served on the Virginia Crime Commission since 2003 and is currently chairman.

David Toscano

David Toscano (D) – 57th District: David Toscano is serving his third term in the Virginia General Assembly, representing the 57th District of the House of Delegates, where he serves on the Courts of Justice; Transportation; and Science & Technology committees. David also serves on the Disability Commission and has served on the special Joint Subcommittee to Study Land Use Tools in the Commonwealth and the Joint Committee to study Math, Science, and Engineering. He is also a member of the United Way Board and the Chamber of Commerce.

David, his wife Nancy A. Tramontin, and son Matthew live in Charlottesville. David is a practicing attorney and an active volunteer for many community-based organizations.

David is an attorney with Buck, Toscano & Tereskerz, Ltd., and specializes in family law, real estate transactions, and estate planning.

David’s priorities are education, energy, and the environment. He fights for education funding, against teacher pay freezes, and to protect VRS and retirement benefits. He pushes the cause of renewable energy, and stood against those who deny the reality of climate change. He opposes predatory lending in its various forms. He argues for multifaceted transportation programs that include roads, rail, and public transit. He opposes cuts to services for the poor and disabled, defends a woman’s right to choose, and advances reforms in foster care and adoption, so that all children will have the opportunity to live productive lives in family settings free from abuse and neglect.

The Virginia League of Conservation Voters has named David a “Legislative Hero” four times for his work on environmental issues.

David was born in Syracuse, New York, the oldest of five children. He received a bachelor’s degree from Colgate University, a Ph.D. from Boston College, and a law degree from the University of Virginia. He has taught politics and sociology at various colleges and universities, including Boston College, University of Maryland (European Division), PVCC, University of Virginia, and James Madison University. He recently taught for the University of Virginia as part of its 14-week Semester at Sea program.

David served on the Charlottesville City Council from 1990 to 2002 and as Mayor 1994-96. David is a resident of the City of Charlottesville, where he lives with his wife, Nancy A. Tramontin, and their son, Matthew.

Mar 272015
 

Stephen Nash speaking to the Sierra Club in Charlottesville.

Climate disruption is often discussed on a global scale, affording many a degree of detachment from what is happening in their own backyards. Environmental journalist Stephen Nash brings home the threat of climate change to the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Mr. Nash spoke to the Sierra Club on March 25, 2015. Sierra Club member John Cruickshank introduced the speaker.

Mar 252015
 

Fourteen Charlottesville High School students presented their versions of TED Talks, called Thought Blocks.

CHS Student Speaking at The Bridge.

The Speakers:
Haley Warren – Writing is a tool
Quincy Pinkston – The Import of Happiness
Cara Warren – In Support of Teenage Exploration
Zaquan Thomas – Music as Message
Joelle Norfleet – What does it mean to be attractive?
Genevieve Riley – Healthy Competition
Nikkia Michie – Our negative experiences can help us grow
Jack Smith – Do something crazy!
John Russel Pinkston – The beautiful lessons of death and dying
Tommy Stadler – The importance of teamwork
Kalif Parker – Why it’s great to be spontaneous
Peter Barcia – The customer is NOT always right
Tess Kendrick – Learning and Curiosity in the 21st Century
Eliya Habimana – What it means to be black in America today

The event was held on March 16, 2015 at The Bridge Progressive Arts Initiative. Jenn Horne, who teaches Public Speaking II at the high school, introduced the speakers.