May 022013
 

Dale Floyd speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

On March 7, 2013, Dale Floyd presented the first lecture in a new six part CPN Thursday series entitled The Civil War Through Different Lenses (2013).

Henry Halleck defined fieldworks as “the art of disposing the ground in such a manner as to enable a small number of troops to resist a larger army the longest time possible.” According to Floyd, creating such fortifications was often difficult work. “To the scarcity of entrenching tools, many of the men were obliged to use their sabre bayonets, tin plates, and in some cases merely their hands to scrape up the dirt for the breastworks.” says Floyd in this podcast.

Dale Floyd studied at Ohio University and the University at Dayton. He has written nine books on military history. Mr. Floyd has been an archivist at the National Archives, and an historian with the US Army Core of Engineers and the National Park Service.

The lecture series was organized by award-winning historian and Charlottesville-based author, lecturer, and cartographer Rick Britton in conjunction with the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

Click here listen all six parts of this series.

Feb 152013
 

Douglas Blackmon speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville Wednesday.

The 13th Amendment ended slavery in the United States, or did it? In this podcast, Pulitzer Prize winner Douglas A. Blackmon talks about what really happened during reconstruction.

Douglas A. Blackmon is the Pulitzer Prize winning author of Slavery by Another Name: The Re- Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II, chair of the University of Virginia’s Miller Center Forum program,  and a contributing editor at the Washington Post. Mr. Blackmon’s book was awarded the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction. The book also received many additional awards and citations and was a New York Times best seller. Mr. Blackmon  is also co-executive producer of a documentary film based on the book which was broadcast on PBS last year. The documentary will be rebroadcast on PBS on February 22, 2013.

Until 2011 he was the longtime chief of The Wall Street Journal’s Atlanta bureau and the paper’s Senior National Correspondent. He has written about, or directed coverage of, some of the most pivotal stories in American life, including the election of President Obama, the rise of the tea party movement, the BP oil spill, and the hurricane Katrina disaster. Prior to his work at the WSJ, Blackmon covered race and politics at the Atlanta Journal Constitution for seven years.

Raised in Leland, Mississippi, Blackmon penned his first newspaper story for the Leland Progress at the age of twelve. He received his degree in English from Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas. At present he is time sharing between Charlottesville and downtown Atlanta where his family makes their home.

Mr. Blackmon spoke at the Wednesday, February 13, 2013 meeting of the Senior Statesmen of Virginia. The meeting was held at the Senior Center in Charlottesville. Following the presentation, questions were taken from the audience. The program was moderated by SSV vice-president Bob McGrath.

Charlottesville’s 2012 Time Capsule

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Dec 222012
 

This plaque will mark the spot where the Charlottesville 2012 Time Capsule will be enshrined Sunday.

In this podcast CPN’s Dan Gould talks with Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society President Steven Meeks about its plans to “bury” a time capsule Sunday.

Steven has had a long time interest in local history. Listen as he talks about the historic ceremony to take place on Sunday December 23, 2012 at 2:00 p.m. at the Society’s building on Second Street NE. The ceremony is a part of Charlottesville’s 250th birthday celebration taking place this year.

Unlike the 1962 time capsule unearthed earlier this year, the new capsule will be encased in a specially made compartment in the ACHS building. By enshrining the capsule above ground it is hoped that its contents will fair better than did those of the 1962 capsule. Listen as Steven tells the story of both the old and new time capsules and of the steps to make sure tomorrow’s capsule will survive until it is opened in 2062.

Wake Up Call: Swannanoa Mansion

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Nov 252012
 

On the November 25 Wake Up Call host Rick Moore talks with Hook journalist Barbara Nordin to talk about the history of and surrounding the historic Swannanoa Mansion that lies on top of Afton Mountain.

Nov 222012
 

Rick Britton speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville

On Thursday, September 27, 2012, Rick Britton presented the fourth and final lecture in our series entitled “Virginia History 301: The Old Dominion in Antebellum Times.”

The date is June 27, 1850 when the very first train rolled into Charlottesville, says Britton, in this fascinating podcast. Rail passengers of time could travel from Richmond, VA to Charlottesville in just 12 hours, says Britton. Listen as he tells the story of the early railroads of central Virginia, and of Claudius Crozet, the brilliant engineer who created the world’s longest tunnel through the Blue Ridge mountains.

Britton, an award-winning historian and Charlottesville-based author, lecturer, and cartographer organized the series in conjunction with the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

This is the fourth and final part of this series. Click here listen all four parts.

Nov 152012
 

Bruce Carveth speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville

On Thursday, September 20, 2012, Bruce Carveth presented the third lecture in our series entitled “Virginia History 301: The Old Dominion in Antebellum Times.”

Carveth tells the story of Edward Coles, an Albemarle County native, who, on April 14, 1819, freed his slaves. The freeing of slaves by ones will was rare, freeing slaves while their master still lived was almost unheard of according to Carveth. Listen as he recounts the amazing events of Cole’s life.

Bruce Carveth is a writer, editor, database developer and independent scholar currently living in Charlottesville, Virginia. Born and raised in Toronto, Ontario, Mr. Carveth moved to Central Virginia in 1983. He discovered the little known story of Edward Coles in 1998 then joined forces with his writing partner Kurt Leichtle to publish Crusade Against Slavery: Edward Coles, Pioneer of Freedom in 2011.

Mr. Carveth has an MA in applied social and community psychology from the University of Guelph in Ontario, and a masters degree in urban and regional planning from Virginia Tech.

The series was organized by award-winning historian and Charlottesville-based author, lecturer, and cartographer Rick Britton in conjunction with the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

This is the third of a four part Thursday series. Click here listen all four parts of this series.

Nov 082012
 

Ed Lay speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville

On Thursday, September 13, 2012, Ed Lay presented the second lecture in our series entitled “Virginia History 301: The Old Dominion in Antebellum Times.”

Mr. Lay explains how classical forms  of architecture, a form which originated in Greece, became known as the “National Style” in the mid 1800s in America. Ed points out that in the American deep south the practice of surrounding homes with Greek-style columns was popular until the Civil War. He continues with specific examples of buildings embodying this form, many of which can still be found in the Charlottesville area. Following his presentation, Mr. Lay answered questions from the audience.

Mr. Lay is the Cary D. Langhorne Professor Emeritus of Architecture at the University of Virginia. A veritable font of architectural knowledge on the Old Dominion, Professor Lay has also taught abroad in Edinburgh and Vicenza.

The series was organized by award-winning historian and Charlottesville-based author, lecturer, and cartographer Rick Britton in conjunction with the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

This is the second of a four part Thursday series. Click here listen all four parts of this series.

Nov 012012
 

Beth Taylor speaking at the Senior Center in Charlottesville

On Thursday, September 6, 2012, Beth Taylor presented the first lecture in a new series entitled “Virginia History 301: The Old Dominion in Antebellum Times.”

In this podcast, you will learn about how the practice of slavery became institutionalized in the American South. According to Taylor, field slaves worked 19 hour days sometimes in extreme temperatures. A slave’s working life could begin as early as age 6. By age 12, they were considered to be adults and assigned an adult’s work load. Taylor wraps up with the 1831 story of Nat Turner’s Rebellion, the bloodiest slave revolt in American history.

Ms. Taylor has served as director of interpretation at Jefferson’s Monticello and as director of education at James Madison’s Montpelier. She is also a fellow at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities.

Taylor’s first book, A Slave in the White House: Paul Jennings and the Madisons was a New York Times best seller and a National Book Award nominee. She has appeared on The Daily Show, with Jon Stewart.

The series was organized by award-winning historian and Charlottesville-based author, lecturer, and cartographer Rick Britton in conjunction with the Senior Center in Charlottesville.

This is the first of a four part Thursday series. Click here listen all four parts of this series.

Jul 102012
 

The Rolleiflex camera used by Ed Roseberry to take many of the photos in this story. (Steve Trumbull photo)

In this continuing series on the Charlottesville Podcasting Network, we are featuring some of the people behind Charlottesville’s 250th birthday celebration. In this episode, photographer Ed Roseberry talks with CPN’s Dan Gould about his collection of historical photographs.

Listen as Ed tells the fascinating story of how he became one of Charlottesville and Albemarle County’s most noted photographers. Then, preview three photographs from his CitySpace exhibit with Ed as your personal guide.

Photographs discussed in this podcast. To view the entire collection visit the Roseberry exhibit at CitySpace on Charlottesville’s Downtown Mall. The exhibit will be officially dedicated this Friday, July 13, 2012 from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The exhibit closes at the end of July.

Copeley Hill Housing, 1966 (Ed Roseberry photo)

Railroad Yard East of Belmont Bridge, 1951 (Ed Roseberry photo)

Intersection of Emmet Street and Barracks Road, 1948 (Ed Roseberry photo)

Ed Roseberry at the unearthing of the Charlottesville time capsule on May 27, 2012. To his left, a photo of Mr. Roseberry taken on the day the capsule was buried in 1962. (Steve Trumbull photo)

The photographs used in our story are courtesy of Trumbull Photography and Ed Roseberry and are used here with permission. For more on Ed Roseberry visit Steve Trumbull’s Charlottesville Then and Now website. Our interview was recorded on July 9, 2012.

Virginia Festival of the Book: What You Didn’t Know About Charlottesville

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Mar 252012
 

Authors and historians speaking in the City of Charlottesville Council Chambers on March 23, 2012.

Eryn Brennan and Margaret Maliszewski (Charlottesville), Jean Cooper (A Guide to Historic Charlottesville and Albemarle County) (presented by Margaret O’Bryant), and Dr. M.C. Wilhelm and Henry K. Sharp (A History of Cancer Care at the University of Virginia, 1901-2011) share stories from Charlottesville’s varied history.

In this podcast you will learn about a Charlottesville neighborhood named “Canada” where freed black slaves once lived, how a $100,000 donation made to UVa by Peter McIntyre was used and about the 1956 filming of the movie Giant with Rock Hudson and Elizabeth Taylor.

The event was hosted in conjunction with Celebrate!250.

Following the presentation questions were taken from the audience. The program was moderated by former Charlottesville Mayor Nancy O’Brien.

The Panel:

Eryn Brennan, co-author of Charlottesville, holds a masters degree in Architectural History and in Urban and Environmental Planning from the University of Virginia. She has been an active preservationist and architectural historian for more than 10 years.

Margaret Maliszewski, author of Charlottesville and a historic preservation planner for more than 20 years, holds a masters degree in architectural history and a certificate in historic preservation from UVA. She is the author of Architecture and Ornament: An Illustrated Dictionary.

Nancy O’Brien has been a consultant and facilitator, was the first woman mayor of Charlottesville, and the first Director of the Thomas Jefferson District Planning Commission.

Margaret M. O’Bryant is librarian for the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society. She is a native of Franklin County, Virginia. Her Virginia background and experiences enrich and develop her current work with Virginia and area history and settlement.

Henry K. Sharp, is the author of A History of Cancer Care at the University of Virginia, 1901-2011.

Morton C. Wilhelm, M.D. Joseph Farrow Professor of Surgical Oncology, and Henry K. Sharp, Phd, wrote A History of Cancer Care at the University of Virginia 1901-2011, based on interviews of UVA’s physicians, nurses, and technicians.

The event was one of a series held during the Virginia Festival of the Book. The series was sponsered by The Virginia Foundation for the Humanities.

Audio for this event was provided courtesy Charlottesville TV10.

Virginia Festival of the Book: Our Sister City in Ghana

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Mar 242012
 

King Peggielene Bartels speaking in Charlottesville’s City Council Chambers on March 23, 2012.

Peggielene Bartels and Eleanor Herman (King Peggy: An American Secretary, Her Royal Destiny, and the Inspiring Story of How She Changed an African Village) discuss how Peggielene became King of the seaside village of Otuam, Ghana. Her village is near Charlottesville’s sister city, Winneba, Ghana. Listen as King Peggy charms the audience in Charlottesville’s City Council Chambers.

Following the presentation questions were taken from the audience. The program was introduced by former Charlottesville Mayor Dave Norris.

The Panel:

Peggielene Bartels, author of King Peggy, was born in Ghana and moved to Washington, D.C., in her early twenties to work at Ghana’s embassy. In 2008, she became King of Otuam, a Ghanaian village. She lives in Silver Spring, Maryland.

Eleanor Herman, co-author of King Peggy, has written three books of women’s history, including the New York Times bestseller Sex with Kings and Sex with the Queen. Her profile of Peggy was a cover story for the Washington Post Magazine.

Dave Norris is the current Executive Director of the Charlottesville Institute for University-Community Engagement. He is a charter member of the Charlottesville-Winneba Sister City Committee, a former Mayor and current member of Charlottesville’s City Council.

The event was one of a series held during the Virginia Festival of the Book. The series was sponsered by The Virginia Foundation for the Humanities.

Audio for this event was provided courtesy Charlottesville TV10.

Virginia Festival of the Book: If Buildings Could Talk

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Mar 232012
 

A panel of local authors speaking in the City of Charlottesville Council Chambers on March 22, 2012.

Learn about the history of Jefferson’s Monticello, Keswick Hall and Grace Church. Following the presentation questions were taken from the audience. The program was introduced by Burt Zisk.

The Panel:

Rick Britton, author of Jefferson: A Monticello Sampler, is a Charlottesville-based author, historian, and cartographer. Having published more than 200 essays and articles, he is a frequent lecturer, radio commentator, and battlefield tour guide.

Patricia Castelli, author of The Story of Keswick Hall, pieced together one hundred years of long-buried history about an estate that became a country club and now a world-class hotel. She serves as resident historian at Keswick Hall.

Barclay Rives, author of A History of Grace Church, is an Albemarle County native. He concerns himself with horses, local history, and characters. All three figure in this book. He is a regular contributor to In & Around Horse Country and Virginia Sportsman.

Burt Zisk is a long-time moderator for the Virginia Festival of the Book, and a former Engineer who worked for GE. He is originally from New York but was brought up in Norfolk, Virginia.

The event was one of a series held during the Virginia Festival of the Book. The series was sponsored by The Virginia Foundation for the Humanities.

Audio for this event was provided courtesy Charlottesville TV10.