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Author, activist, and proponent of a citizen led uprising, Ted Rall, joins Coy in studio to discuss his latest book, The Anti-American Manifesto. Rall’s other work can be found at www.rall.com

 

 

8.9.10- Author Alexandra Spunt joins Coy live on the program to discuss her book No More Dirty Looks.  The book highlights the dangers of everyday cosmetics.   Alexandra provides advice about shampoo, sunscreen, and expiration dates.

 

7.26.10- Local Author and Historian Susan Tyler Hitchcock joins Coy live in studio.  They discuss Hitchcock’s newest book, Frankenstein: A Cultural History.

May 142008
 

In today’s show, adapted from an article published on the Oscar Web site written by Margaret Grundy, we look at be the research of Richard Handler, UVa professor of anthropology, and how the popularized story of colonial Williamsburg, upon reexamination reveals different side of tale.

When Americans visit Colonial Williamsburg, they come to celebrate their nation’s history, to learn about the ways of the past and to experience firsthand the ideals and idealism of the Founding Fathers. They come to try on hoopskirts and three-cornered hats; to make their own candles and to take carriage rides down Duke of Gloucester Street. They come, in short, to have a good time.

Yet the story of Colonial Williamsburg is not entirely pleasant…

For more information about the show or to see the full text, visit the Oscar Show’s blog.

 

Are you happy? Well don’t try to be happier; you might become less happy. That is the essence of a multi-cultural study published this month in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. The study was produced by University of Virginia psychology professor Shigehiro Oishi and his co-authors Ed Diener, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign and The Gallup Organization, Dong-Won Choi of California State University, East Bay, Chu Kim-Prieto of the College of New Jersey, and Incheol Choi of Seoul National University. Professor Oishi and his colleagues found that, on average, European-Americans claim to be happy in general, more happy than Asian-Americans or Koreans or Japanese. But it is much easier for them to become less happy by negative events. And they tend to recover at a slower rate from negative events than their counterparts in Asia or with an Asian ancestry. On the other hand, Koreans, Japanese, and to a lesser extent, Asian-Americans, are less happy in general, but recover their emotional equilibrium more readily after a setback than European-Americans.

For more information about the show or to see the full text, visit the Oscar Show’s blog.

 

A Major intersection in Lucknow

CPN correspondent Deepak Singh recently got back from a trip to Lucknow, and is still settling in to his life back here in Charlottesville. Late last month we brought you his first essay which described his first few moments back in the country. This week, Deepak tells the story of what it was like being back in India, a place that has changed rapidly since he left two years ago for Charlottesville. Follow Deepak Singh on Facebook and Twitter.

 

A major intersection in Lucknow

The end of summer is here, which means a new crop of programs here on CPN. We’re returning to an old theme this week with a new piece from Deepak Singh, our reporter for the South Asian community here in Central Virginia. Deepak spent this summer back in Lucknow, the first time he’s been back to India in two years. Here’s the first of two essays from Deepak about returning home, only to find that he was beginning to miss Charlottesville. Follow Deepak Singh on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Another essay from Janis Jaquith. This time, the writer wonders about the relatively new technology that allows expecting women to discover the sex of their child-to-be. You can read along here.

 

This essay from Janis Jaquith is on something true and dear to me – being a night owl! To read along with the text, click here.

This entry was edited on March 12, 2006…

 

Writer and radio commentator Janis Jaquith is known for her witty essays about raising three children in Central Virginia. We’re featuring some of her classic commentaries here on CPN, using an introductory series of four essays as an example of a weekly podcast.

You can read along at: http://www.radioessays.com/essays/photorestore/

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