Dec 202006
 

This is a first-hand account of an island in Japan called Gunkanjima. In the spring of 2005, I traveled to this island to photograph and explore its history. Gunkanjima was an old coal mining island that holds the highest population density recording in the world. In the 1970′s the island was shut down, leaving behind a ghost town of a once thriving society.

 Posted by at 12:33 pm
Sep 152006
 

The region’s first bilingual public affairs program will debut tomorrow on WVAW ABC16 at 9:00 AM. Zona Latina has been created to give Spanish-language speakers the chance to find out more about the community. I recently stopped by the Charlottesville Newsplex to speak with Diane Taylor and Carlos Teran, the show’s producers.

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Sep 122006
 

A transplant from Northern Virginia has started a new group called the Charlottesville Sports & Social Club. The club began operations this past Sunday with the first games for mobile phone in the inaugural Kickball League at Azalea Park. I stopped by and spoke with club director and umpire Chad Day.

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Aug 182006
 

 

Amy Lee-Tai’s mother and family were forced by the federal government to relocate to an internment camp in 1942. Lee-Tai has published a children’s book inspired by her family’s experience. A Place Where Sunflowers Grow is published by Children’s Book Press.

This piece was originally commissioned to air on WVTF Public Radio’s Studio Virginia program. CPN also receives support from the Charlottesville Daily Progress.

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Aug 092006
 

Franklin wore ‘em. And you may not know it, but Jefferson did, too. In late 2005 radio producer Sean Tubbs (of the Charlottesville Podcast Network) interviewed scholar Katherine Stebbins McCaffrey who came to the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies to study Jefferson’s interest in eyeglasses as part of larger look at the history of spectacles and how their design and use changed in the 18th and 19th centuries (added to Monticello Podcasts on August 1, 2006).

Jul 242006
 


Rick Wellbeloved-Stone (left) and Christian DeBaun (right) spar while their master instructors look on…

Myo Sim Karate and Kendo celebrated its fortieth anniversary in Charlottesville this weekend with its annual black belt exams. Myo Sim was founded by Grand Master Sung Hong, a Korean immigrant who opened his first dojo near Galludet University in 1963. One of his students brought the practice to Charlottesville when he entered studies at the University of Virginia. Classes in both karate and kendo are now taught at ACAC. Sean Tubbs attended the celebrations, and spoke with Rick Wellbeloved-Stone and Christian DeBaun, two of Myo Sim’s instructors in Charlottesville.

Bryan MacKenzie wrote about Myo Sim last week in the Daily Progress.

Subscribe to the CPN podcast

CPN is an aggregator of podcasts from in and around Charlottesville. We post about a dozen or so pieces a week, from everything from public lectures to call-in shows like WINA’s Charlottesville–Right Now. To make sure you don’t miss anything, subscribe to the show for free in iTunes. This will automatically download everything posted here into your iTunes folder. Listen on your computer, or take CPN with you on the road.

Jul 042006
 

New citizens take the Oath of Citizenship at Monticello

There are sixty-nine more Americans in the area around Charlottesville this week. The new citizens took the Oath of Citizenship on the steps of Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello on Independence Day. They were welcomed by fellow naturalized citizens Christo and Jeanne-Claude, the pair responsible for huge public art projects such as The Gates and the wrapping of the Reichstag.

This is a six minute report featuring the highlights from the ceremony. Check here for the full ceremony.

Jun 052006
 

From the Monticello Podcast:

“A dozen years, several conferences, a score of books, and hundreds of scholars from twenty countries. Radio producer Sean Tubbs talks with Andrew J. O’Shaughnessy, Saunders Director of the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies about the Center’s work fostering and sharing new Jeffersonian scholarship at home and abroad.”

May 082006
 

Courtesy of Bill Emory

Charlottesville is going through a dramatic period of transformation, caused by the region’s quality of life and a general rise in housing prices. This has forced the evolution of the city’s historic neighborhoods, including the Woolen Mills area, just to the east of the downtown mall. In this second in our continuing series on Charlottesville area bloggers, photographer Bill Emory takes us on a tour of the neighborhood. He’s taking a visual inventory of what the area looks like today to make sure it’s still there tomorrow.

You can read more on the Woolen Mills area here. This piece is supported in part by the Charlottesville Daily Progress, our news partner.

Our series of conversations with Charlottesville bloggers began with a talk with Chris and Darlene Bruce, the folks behind Eat Air, a blog about vegan cooking.

May 022006
 

Supporters of immigrants’ rights held demonstrations across the nation yesterday as part of a day of action to demand fair treatment. Many are opposed to border security legislation that passed the House of Representatives that would make it a felony to be in the country illegally.

Over three hundred people turned out at a rally in Charlottesville Monday night to show their support. They sang songs, lined Preston Avenue, and heard comments from Tim Freilich, the managing attorney of the Virginia Justice Center for Farm and Immigrant Workers.

This podcast is an expansion of a report produced for WVTF Public Radio, and features some of the songs and Freilich’s comments. We also spoke with one of the people who participated in the rally.

The Daily Progress has coverage of the event from Sarah Barry. We’ll update this page with other links as we can find them. We’d like to know what you think as well. Please leave a comment below. Bill Emory has a nice picture of a painting that was displayed on the steps of the Albemarle County Executive Office Building. Waldo has a post on it, and mentions that Nell Boeschenstein of C-Ville Weekly wrote about it as well.

Apr 292006
 


Courtesy of the Montpelier Foundation

Two years ago, James Madison’s Montpelier was partially demolished in the first step of major renovations to restore the house to the way it was back in Madison’s day. The Montpelier Foundation hopes the reconstruction will allow visitors to the Orange County estate to learn more about James Madison, who is often called the father of the U.S. Constitution.
On a sunny day in late April, the new/old exterior of the mansion was formally unveiled in ceremonies presided over by Senator John Warner and Representative Eric Cantor. Both men paid tribute to Madison’s role in the creation of the United States of America. In this report, you’ll hear excerpts from both men’s speeches. You’ll also hear from Mark Wenger, the project’s architectural historian. Ambient music in the piece comes from the Shenandoah University chorus, who were on hand to sing the national anthem.

Mar 202006
 

John F. Kennedy signed the Peace Corps into existence by executive order on March 1, 1961. Since then, the University of Virginia has sent over 800 volunteers to all corners of the globe. Since 2000, over 400 U.Va graduates have gone overseas to honor and sustain Kennedy’s vision of an agency that works for world peace through coexistence and understanding. Last week, U.Va celebrated its special role in the Peace Corps in a day-long series of conversations and musical performances.

We spoke with three volunteers about what they learned. Charlottesville resident Bob Vernon served in Venezuela in the 1970′s. Curry School graduate Sara Johnston served in Namibia and the Gambia from 1998 through the end of 2000. Matt Hural is the current on-Grounds recruiter for the Peace Corps. Their remarks are book-ended by comments by deputy director Jody Olsen in this 27-minute podcast.

Update: The Hook features the stories of several U.Va graduates who served in the Peace Corps in its July 27 edition.