Jacob Canon

Reflections on Race and Gender in Politics Forum

 History, National politics, UVA  Comments Off on Reflections on Race and Gender in Politics Forum
Oct 012008
 

In today’s show, we share comments and reflections from the UVa Faculty Roundtable concerning Race and Gender in Politics.

Last Thursday, the Miller Center of Public Affairs hosted the UVa Faculty Round Table on Race and Gender in Politics. Sponsored by the University of Virginia’s Arts & Sciences Magazine, the forum was moderated by Douglas Blackmon, the Atlanta bureau chief for the Wall Street Journal. The panel included UVa faculty members, Paul Freedman, Brian Nosek, Lynn Sanders, Vesla Weaver and Nick Winter.

Moderator, Douglas Blackmon called this point in time “an extraordinary moment in American history and American discourse,” while Associate Politics Professor Paul Freedman referred to this time as “Christmas” for political scientists because of the multicultural base of the presidential candidates.

For more information about the show or to see the full text, visit the Oscar Show’s blog

Race and Gender in Politics

 History, Interviews, National politics, UVA  Comments Off on Race and Gender in Politics
Sep 242008
 

In today’s show, we introduce the Moderator and UVa Faculty panel participating in the Race and Gender in Politics Forum being held tomorrow evening at 7:00 PM at the Miller Center of Public Affairs, located at 2201 Old Ivy Road, in Charlottesville, VA.  This event is free to the public.

With the election season upon us, and the diverse nature of the major candidates, Americans are faced with unique challenges when they go to the polls this November 4th.  With the notable exception of Geraldine Ferraro in 1984, the major candidates for the office of President of the United States have been white males.  But this election season, both major political parties have offered candidates that begin to explore the multicultural basis of our nation.

For more information about the show or to see the full text, visit the Oscar Show’s blog
Tomorrow evening, September 25th at 7:00PM, the Miller Center of Public Affairs will be hosting the UVa Faculty Round Table on Race and Gender in Politics.   This event is sponsored by the University of Virginia’s Arts & Sciences Magazine will be Moderated by Douglas A Blackmon, the Atlanta bureau chief for the Wall Street Journal.  This forum will discuss many of the issues that face the electorate this season.  The panel will include UVa faculty members, Paul Freedman, Brian Nosek, Lynn Sanders, Vesla Weaver and Nick Winter.

The Heart of the Matter

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Sep 172008
 

In today’s show, adapted from an article written by Fariss Samarrai, Senior News Officer with the Office of Public Affairs, we discuss the research of a multi-institutional team of scientists, including Bob Hirosky, a University of Virginia associate professor of physics, and their attempt to verify or refute the existence of the Higgs boson, which is theorized to be the essence of all matter, and the ultimate basis of everything in the universe.

Man’s eternal quest to understand the world we live in has led to a series of discoveries that questioned the conventional thinking of the time. In centuries past the great minds that have advanced human knowledge have either been lauded or treated as heretics. Today’s more tolerant and informed world of science has delved into the deep reaches of space, as well as the smallest inner workings of all matter.

Just recently, an international effort to understand the most basic structure of matter has yielded a particle that is critical to further understanding of the universe and its evolution.

For more information about the show or to see the full text, visit the Oscar Show’s blog

Identifying Reasons for Hamstring Pulls

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Sep 102008
 

In today’s show, adapted from an article written for the U.Va. Engineer , the Alumni Magazine of the UVA School of Egineering and Applied Science, by freelance writer Charlie Feigenoff, we discuss the research of Silvia Salinas Blemker, an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, who is trying to identify reasons and mechanics of hamstring pulls.

When the world’s best sprinters stepped up to the mark at the 100 meter final during this summer’s Olympic Games in Peking, they were moments away from subjecting their leg muscles to thousands of pounds of force as they fought to be first across the finish line less than 10 seconds later. By and large, their leg muscles handled the strain well, but inevitably one or more of these elite runners, despite intense conditioning, will suffer a hamstring pull during the track and field season.

As Silvia Salinas Blemker, an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the University of Virginia’s School of Engineering and Applied Science has said, “Of all the muscles that work together when we run quickly, the muscles in the hamstring group are most subject to injury, and one particular hamstrings muscle, the biceps femoris long head, is most commonly injured.”

For more information about the show or to see the full text, visit the Oscar Show’s blog

Energy Efficient Smart Climate Controls

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Sep 032008
 

In today’s show, adapted from an article written by Brevy Cannon, general assignment writer for UVa’s Office of Public Affairs, we discuss the research of Ron Williams, a professor of electrical and computer engineering, and his teams research of how to make more intelligent climate control systems, to aid in energy efficiency.

It’s not a new energy-saving concept to turn down your thermostat at night, or leave your air conditioner off when no one is home. A research team plans to take that concept to the next level by using automated sensors and sophisticated software to enable heating and cooling systems to respond to the number of occupants in a room at any given time.

The research team, which recently won a new UVa Collaborative Sustainable Energy Seed Grant worth about $30,000 to investigate how to make more intelligent climate control systems, includes Ron Williams, a professor of electrical and computer engineering…

For more information about the show or to see the full text, visit the Oscar Show’s blog.

New Method for Processing Rape Kit Evidence

 UVA  Comments Off on New Method for Processing Rape Kit Evidence
Aug 272008
 

In today’s show, adapted from an article written by Fariss Samarrai, senior news officer for UVa’s Office of Public Affairs, we discuss the research of Jessica Voorhees Norris, a Ph.D. candidate in forensic chemistry at UVa, who has developed a method for handling rape kit evidence that reduces part of the DNA analysis time from 24 hours to as little as 30 to 45 minutes.

With approximately 250,000 items of sexual assault evidence mired in three- to 12-month backlogs as they await analysis in U.S. forensic laboratories, there is an alarming nationwide need for a time-efficient way to get this work done. And according to Jessica Voorhees Norris, a Ph.D. candidate in forensic chemistry, she has found a better way. She developed a method for handling rape kit evidence that reduces part of the DNA analysis time from 24 hours to as little as 30 to 45 minutes and improves the sperm cell recovery rate by 100 percent. If her method is adopted by forensic labs – and the results accepted by courts – the backlog could potentially be reduced within months.

For more information about the show or to see the full text, visit the Oscar Show’s blog.

UVa Remains Leader in Graduating Black Students

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Aug 202008
 

In today’s show, adapted from an article written by Anne E. Bromley, Senior Writer, Editor for UVa’s Office of Public Affairs, we discuss UVa’s outstanding graduation rates among African-American students at all public universities in the nation.

For the 14th straight year, the University of Virginia’s African-American students posted the highest graduation rate among those at all public universities in the nation, according to the annual compilation published in the winter 2007-08 issue, of the Journal of Blacks in Higher Education. The journal reports that U.Va.’s graduation rate of 87 percent makes it “the leader by far in successfully graduating black students” at flagship state universities.

For more information about the show or to see the full text, visit the Oscar Show’s blog.

UVa Remains Leader in Graduating Black Students

 History, UVA  Comments Off on UVa Remains Leader in Graduating Black Students
Aug 202008
 

In today’s show, adapted from an article written by Anne E. Bromley, Senior Writer, Editor for UVa’s Office of Public Affairs, we discuss UVa’s outstanding graduation rates among African-American students at all public universities in the nation.

For the 14th straight year, the University of Virginia’s African-American students posted the highest graduation rate among those at all public universities in the nation, according to the annual compilation published in the winter 2007-08 issue, of the Journal of Blacks in Higher Education. The journal reports that U.Va.’s graduation rate of 87 percent makes it “the leader by far in successfully graduating black students” at flagship state universities.

For more information about the show or to see the full text, visit the Oscar Show’s blog.

Aug 132008
 

In today’s show, adapted from an article written by David Foreman, writer for UVa’s Health System Media Relations Department, we look at University of Virginia researcher; Richard J. Price, who has received a three-year grant from The Hartwell Foundation to further his research on an innovative method to treat pediatric brain tumors.

Technical advancements in the past decade have made it possible to extend the basic principles of non-invasive, high-intensity, focused ultrasound for destroying organ-confined tumors. However, ultrasound beam aberrations and localized non-specific heating created by the skull are impediments to brain tumor treatment, which could be especially profound in developing children…

For more information about the show or to see the full text, visit the Oscar Show’s blog.

Educating Students to Be Global Citizens

 Interviews, UVA  Comments Off on Educating Students to Be Global Citizens
Aug 062008
 

In today’s show, adapted from an article written by Rebecca P. Arrington, Assistant Director of Media Relations, we look at the annual Walter A. Ridley Distinguished Lecture at the University of Virginia, held in April in the Rotunda’s Dome Room.

“In an increasingly diverse nation and interconnected world, educators must teach students to be global citizens committed to justice for all people,” a leading voice in multicultural education told a audience at the annual Walter A. Ridley Distinguished Lecture at the University of Virginia. The Ridley Lecture Series honors U.Va.’s first African-American graduate, who received his doctorate in education from the Curry School in 1953 and went on to a distinguished career in higher education administration.

According to James A. Banks, director of the University of Washington’s Center for Multicultural Education and the Kerry and Linda Killinger Professor of Diversity Studies, “schools across the nation and the world are becoming increasingly diverse due to immigration…”

For more information about the show or to see the full text, visit the Oscar Show’s blog.

Deborah E. McDowell recently named director of the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies at UVa

 UVA  Comments Off on Deborah E. McDowell recently named director of the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies at UVa
Jul 232008
 

In today’s show, adapted from an article written by Anne Bromley, senior writer and editor for UVa Media Relations, we look at well-known writer, scholar and editor of African-American literature for both academic and general audiences, Deborah E. McDowell who was recently named director of the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies at UVa.

Well-known writer, scholar and editor of African-American literature for both academic and general audiences, Deborah E. McDowell, was recently named director of the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies at UVa.

The Woodson Institute, an interdisciplinary teaching and research center, was established in 1981 in response to student and faculty requests for a more coherent African-American and African Studies program and a more aggressive program of minority recruitment at the University. It is named after Carter Woodson, the “father of African-American history,” to honor the Virginia-born founder of African and African-American Studies who also inaugurated Black History Week (now Black History Month).

For more information about the show or to see the full text, visit the Oscar Show’s blog.

Reconsidering the Presidency

 History, National politics, UVA  Comments Off on Reconsidering the Presidency
Jul 092008
 

In today’s show, written by Brevy Cannon, General Assignments writer for University of Virginia Media Relations, we look at a recent Center for Politics event, “Reconsidering the Presidency” held at the University of Virginia in April 2008.

“The vast and ever-increasing amounts of money spent on U.S. political campaigns are a detriment to our democracy. And, contrary to public opinion, the Electoral College is a quirk of American politics that should not be tampered with…”

Those two opinions were shared by three former governors, John Sununu of New Hampshire, Lowell Weicker of Connecticut and Virginia’s Doug Wilder, during the Center for Politics event, “Reconsidering the Presidency” in April 2008…

For more information about the show or to see the full text, visit the Oscar Show’s blog.