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We apologize for the recent halt in our full operation. The server that runs our site has been experiencing technical difficulties, which means the database that runs WordPress has been offline, so we’ve been waiting patiently to resume operations.

While I have your attention, I’ll share some information about what we’ve done so far, and give you a sense of what we’re all about. We created CPN back in April to provide an outlet for speeches, panel discussions and features that were recorded in our area. Since then, we’ve had over 4,000 downloads, on everything from the Sunday Morning Wakeup Call, to a preview of what’s happening at the Prism. We’re the only place where you’ll find this kind of audio programming, for use on your computer or your iPod. We’re dedicated to expanding the public square, providing a public service that has heretofore gone unfulfilled.

With a spirit of adventure, we are currently developing several more programs for your enjoyment and education, and hope to produce some interesting pilots in July and August. We see this as an experimental website that will serve as a test for citizen-driven radio. What ideas do you have? Have you ever wanted to produce radio? We’ll train you, and put you to work. There are all kinds of great things that happen in this town that most of us can’t get to.

We will also be altering the way in which we handle podcasting feeds, splitting into several different kind of feeds. We’ll have one for speeches, one for features, and one for interviews, perhaps. Maybe one for experimental music, or for poetry!

Are you interested in becoming a CPN producer? Perhaps you can develop a podcast for your interest, organization, religion, or business.

CPN’s parent company, Wordcast Productions, is now ready to offer equipment and rudimentary training to people who have an audio project in mind. Whether it be a documentary about your love of Scrabble to a feature about an upcoming play, we feel that podcasting is an excellent way to spread the word about cultural and political events in town. We can help you get your message across.

We’ll be holding an informational meeting on Tuesday, July 12 in the downstairs at Court Square Tavern, at 8:00. If it’s a bit too smoky for you, we’ll hold another one later in the month. We’ll have a basic introduction to audio recording and reporting, and maybe talk a little about the craft of audio.

Things seem back to normal at the moment, but that could change as the server company settles things down.

Contact us at seantubbs AT gmail.com if you’re interested in attending, or to ask any questions. Together we can offer an alternative voice.

 

This is Monticello For the 43rd time yesterday, the Thomas Jefferson Foundation offered up Monticello for a special naturalization ceremony on the anniversary of our nation’s birth. 79 people became citizens on the 229th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, written of course by Mr. Jefferson. This year’s speaker was famed architect I.M. Pei, whose comments are approximately eight minutes into this hour-long ceremony. Special thanks to Travis Messinger for providing us with the audio of this event, and to Chad Wollerton at Monticello.
This is I.M. Pei

This file is now offline and will be reposted upon request

 

An elementary school teacher is one of the hardest professions in the known universe. Not only do you have to cope with several children at once, you’ll also have to deal with the politics of accountability, concerned parents, and scarce resources. On this week’s show, Rick Moore speaks with two people who’ll help us understand why someone would take on the challenge.

“Roger” is a college student seeking to be an elementary school teacher, and if he does, he’ll be a rare breed. Most teachers of students in kindergarten to fifth grade are women. “Kathy” is a ten-year veteran of teaching who currently educates kids in an urban school district somewhere in Virginia.

The weekly commentary considers Independence Day in a country gone mad.

WNRN’s Sunday Morning Wakeup Call airs every week at 11:00 AM. Rick will take your phone calls at 979-0919 or 1-877-967-6762.

This file is now offline. If you would like to hear it, please contact us at seantubbs(at)gmail.com…

 

We’re only two months old, so we don’t have a lot of policies, or style
guides, or anything like that. But, when we first launched the site, we
didn’t expect to be doing personal reviews, or anything like that. And
we still don’t.

But this week, I watched a great television program on FX that embodies
the kind of journalism I think we need more of in this country. The show is
called 30 Days, and it’s by Morgan Spurlock, the same guy who spent a month eating nothing but McDonalds for the movie Super Size Me . This week’s episode is about a Christian guy from West Virginia who travels to Dearborn, Michigan, to live as a Muslim for 30 days.

This is my quick review of the show, which should be watched by anyone interested in getting past this crazy us versus them mentality that we seem to have in our country these days.

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